≡ Menu
NX Logo
Share the knowledge

I started this series on what I’ve learned about migrating CAD data into Teamcenter a couple of weeks ago. The more I write, the more I find there is to write; as I pull on the thread of memory more and more details are pulled to the surface.

I was working on a different post in this series when I realized that what I had missed was a look at the big picture: what does you native data look like? What does your Teamcenter look like? What must you maintain when you migrate? These are the sorts of questions that will help you understand the complexity and level of effort you can expect from your CAD migration project.

I believe that working through the following questions will help you to shape an effective migration plan. If you can think of any others please share them in the comments below.

[click to continue…]

{ 14 comments }
Share the knowledge

Last time I discussed the problems with native NX CAD files while data migrations into Teamcenter that I’ve seen. This week we’ll begin looking at how to proceed with the migration — or at least what I’ve done. What I did may not work for your situation, but at least it should give you something to think about.
[click to continue…]

{ 0 comments }
Share the knowledge

The subject of migrating NX CAD data into Teamcenter has come up recently in discussions I’ve been involved with. Data migrations have also been one of the more interesting projects I’ve personally worked on, so I thought it might warrant a post or two.

I’m going to start off buy discussing some of the problems I’ve seen with the raw data, the part files that needed to be migrated into Teamcenter. I suspect that many of the issues I dealt with are pretty common and not specific to any one CAD application (or even to CAD data itself).
[click to continue…]

{ 14 comments }
Share the knowledge

I want to share some problems I’ve had with Teamcenter 8.3. I’ve come across two functions in Teamcenter 8.3 where I attempted to pass in the name of a base object type and expected the function to apply to all subtypes of that type, however the behavior was not inherited by the children types. I suspect there may be other examples of this problem waiting to be found. [click to continue…]

{ 3 comments }


One of the things in my current to-do list was to figure out how to display a LOV value along with it’s description. For example, If I wanted to attach the foundation level Model Velocity Unit LOV to an attribute then the possible values would be the numbers 1–7. More valuable to the user would be to show them the descriptions, which include m/sec, mm/sec, in/sec, etc.

Well, I didn’t know how to do that. Fortunately for me, I came across Dave Merrit’s “technical how-to get stuff done better and faster blog,” Dave’s Rave and his how-to post on how to attach both an LOV value and description to properties.

Like Johnny Carson used to say, “I did not know that.” So thanks, Dave!

{ 1 comment }
Optimization WordPress Plugins & Solutions by W3 EDGE